Anal Fissure: A Common Cause of Anal Pain


Herman Villalba, MD; Sabrina Villalba, MD; Maher A Abbas, MD, FACS, FASCRS

Fall 2007 - Volume 11 Number 4

https://doi.org/10.7812/TPP/07-072

Vignette


A patient presents with severe anal pain, lasting hours after each bowel movement. She notices some intermittent bleeding with defecation. She comes to the office with the presumed diagnosis of hemorrhoids. Are her symptoms consistent with hemorrhoidal disease, or does she have another disorder?

Introduction


Benign anorectal disorders are common and increasing in incidence. The decreasing intake in dietary fiber over the 20th century and into the 21st has contributed to a steady rise in preventable anorectal disorders. It is estimated that 20% of the American public has such benign conditions.1 Although hemorrhoids represent the most common benign anorectal disorder, anal pain is most often secondary to an acute or chronic anal fissure and not hemorrhoidal disease.1-14

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