Do Patients Understand?

Do Patients Understand?


Suzanne Graham, RN, PhD; John Brookey, MD

Summer 2008 - Volume 12 Number 3

https://doi.org/10.7812/TPP/07-144

 

Background


Communication barriers often go undetected in health care settings and can have serious effects on the health and safety of patients. Limited literacy skills are one of the strongest predictors of poor health outcomes for patients.1,2 Studies have shown that when patients have low reading fluency, they know less about their chronic diseases, they are worse at managing their care,3 and they are less likely to take preventive measures for their health.4 However, patients do not need to have limited literacy skills to have low health literacy. The Institute of Medicine defines health literacy as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions."5

TPJ Reader Survey

The Permanente Journal values your opinion. Please take this time to give us your input, which will help us to serve you better. Click here to complete the survey and for a chance to win one of two Apple Watches.

Circulation

25,000 print readers per quarter, 7,628 eTOC readers, and in 2016, 1.4 million page views on TPJ articles in PubMed from a broad international readership.

Subscriptions

The Permanente Journal (ISSN 1552-5767) is published quarterly by The Permanente Press. Journal subscriptions are entered for the calendar year. Advance payment in US dollars is required.

Letters

Articles, editorials, letters to the editor, and other material represent the opinion of the authors. Send your comments to permanente.journal@kp.org.


Copyright 2017 The Permanente Journal - Kaiser Permanente. All Rights Reserved.